Murmujú

"The man who is aware of himself is henceforward independent; and he is never bored, and life is only too short, and he is steeped through and through with a profound yet temperate happiness. He alone lives, while other people, slaves of ceremony, let life slip past them in a kind of dream. Once conform, once do what other people do because they do it, and a lethargy steals over all the finer nerves and faculties of the soul. She becomes all outer show and inward emptiness; dull, callous, and indifferent."

The Common Reader, by Virginia Woolf : MONTAIGNE (via readandbreathe)

(via readandbreathe)

9emeart:

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9emeart:

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The significance of plot without conflict

stilleatingoranges:

In the West, plot is commonly thought to revolve around conflict: a confrontation between two or more elements, in which one ultimately dominates the other. The standard three- and five-act plot structures—which permeate Western media—have conflict written into their very foundations. A “problem” appears near the end of the first act; and, in the second act, the conflict generated by this problem takes center stage. Conflict is used to create reader involvement even by many post-modern writers, whose work otherwise defies traditional structure.

The necessity of conflict is preached as a kind of dogma by contemporary writers’ workshops and Internet “guides” to writing. A plot without conflict is considered dull; some even go so far as to call it impossible. This has influenced not only fiction, but writing in general—arguably even philosophy. Yet, is there any truth to this belief? Does plot necessarily hinge on conflict? No. Such claims are a product of the West’s insularity. For countless centuries, Chinese and Japanese writers have used a plot structure that does not have conflict “built in”, so to speak. Rather, it relies on exposition and contrast to generate interest. This structure is known as kishōtenketsu.

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"So far as we feel sympathy, we feel we are not accomplices to what caused the suffering. Our sympathy proclaims our innocence as well as our impotence. To that extent, it can be (for all our good intentions) an impertinent –if not inappropriate– response. To set aside the sympathy we extend to others beset by war and murderous politics for a reflection on how our privileges are located on the same map as their suffering, and may –in ways we might prefer not to imagine– be linked to their suffering, as the wealth as some may imply the destitution of others, is a task for which the painful, stirring images supply only an initial spark."

— Susan Sontag, Regarding the Pain of Others (via vul-va)

"Democritus and Heraclitus were two philosophers, of whom the first, finding the condition of man vain and ridiculous, never went out in public but with a mocking and laughing face; whereas Heraclitus, having pity and compassion on this same condition of ours, wore a face perpetually sad, and eyes filled with tears. I prefer the first humor; not because it is pleasanter to laugh than to weep, but because it is more disdainful, and condemns us more than the other; and it seems to me that we can never be despised as much as we deserve. Pity and commiseration are mingled with some esteem for the thing we pity; the things we laugh at we consider worthless. I do not think there is as much unhappiness in us as vanity, nor as much malice as stupidity. We are not so full of evil as of inanity; we are not as wretched as we are worthless."

— Michel de Montaigne, Of Democritus And Heraclitus.

The Idea of Wings

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(Source: nosex)

     Robert Bresson fit l’étonné puis sortit enfin dehors en compagnie de Pierre Klossowski. Je marchais derrière eux et je l’entendis avec surprise lui répéter exactement ce qu’il avait dit deux semaines auparavant à Walter Green.
     —Vous deviendrez le personnage du marchand de grains quand vous accepterez de rester vous-même. C’est pour cette raison que j’ai tourné en premier avec Anne, pour que vous l’observiez… Anne ne rajoute aucune intention et ne fait pas de psychologie… C’est pour ça qu’elle est toujours juste et toujours vraie. 

Anne Wiazemsky, Jeune fille.

     Robert Bresson fit l’étonné puis sortit enfin dehors en compagnie de Pierre Klossowski. Je marchais derrière eux et je l’entendis avec surprise lui répéter exactement ce qu’il avait dit deux semaines auparavant à Walter Green.

     —Vous deviendrez le personnage du marchand de grains quand vous accepterez de rester vous-même. C’est pour cette raison que j’ai tourné en premier avec Anne, pour que vous l’observiez… Anne ne rajoute aucune intention et ne fait pas de psychologie… C’est pour ça qu’elle est toujours juste et toujours vraie.

Anne Wiazemsky, Jeune fille.